morphology

Morphological decomposition: more than islands of regularity?

A wealth of psycholinguistic evidence has shown that words, before being visually recognized, decompose into smaller units which seem to correspond to morphemes (Rastle et al., 2000, 2004). Such a procedure of morphological decomposition seems to occur in words that are made of more than one morpheme, independently of whether they are semantically transparent (e.

Allomorphy: when, how, why

In recent year, much effort in theoretical linguistics has devoted to defining the grammatical restrictions governing morphological alternations, in which the exponence of an element x depends on the context in which x occurs.

Dominance-driven morphological decomposition

The term dominance refers to the relative frequency of a given derived or inflected word form with respect to its stem word form. For example, a plural form such as worlds is labeled as singular-dominant because the inflected form worlds is less frequent than the stem form world; conversely, a plural form such as windows is labeled as plural-dominant because the inflected form windows is more frequent than the stem form window.

Lexical selectivity in visual morphological decomposition

In some preliminary results reported in my dissertation, priming effects are shown to arise for specific affixes: i.e., -able, -ful, im-, -ity, -ment, -ness, -s; but not for others: dis-, in-, -er.

Phonology-driven decomposition

This project asks whether decomposition is affected by phonologically-conditioned morphological alternations, in which the alternants realize the same value of a given morpho-syntactic feature and can be accounted for by assuming language-wide, regular phonological operations triggered by the surrounding phonological context.

Prime masking in the auditory modality

Most psycholinguistic research on morphological decomposition has been conducted in the visual modality. The main reason for this is that our current behavioral methodologies seem unable to investigate auditory decomposition at the subliminal level of processing.

More than Islands of Regularity: An Investigation of the Sensitivity of Morphological Decomposition to Higher-level Linguistic Properties

A wealth of psycholinguistic evidence has shown that words, before being visually recognized, decompose into smaller units which seem to correspond to morphemes (Rastle et al. 2000, Rastle et al. 2004).

Allomorphy at Italian determiners at the morphology-phonology interface

Allomorphic alternations are often accounted for by assuming them to be listed as idiosyncratic lexical entries. This paper analyzes the forms of the determiners (definite, indefinite, and demostratives) and definite prepositions across all Italo-Romance varieties, to show that such a view (for a review on accounts for the definite determiner, see Garrapa 2011) may lead to lose crucial generalizations at the morpho-phonological interface.

Greek Root Allomorphy without Spans

In this paper, we focus on a set of data from Greek root-allomorphy that has been recently presented by Merchant (2015) as a counterexample to the strong hypothesis from Embick (2010) that linear adjacency between the trigger and the target is required for morphosyntactically-conditioned allomorphy to arise.